Monday, August 25, 2014

Hydration Planning For Squash Players

Ok so today I'm going to post my last fact sheet I designed for my sport nutrition class. This one is about hydration. And we all know that hydration is no joke! So have a look and maybe you'll earn something new. Most people don't drink unless they are already thirsty and by this time they are already dehydrated. I also learned that a sports drink can rehydrate better than water because of the electrolytes and it makes you thirsty so you drink more. I have my references at the end of the document for those that want to see where I got my information from.

Hydration is also an appropriate topic because I've been thinking about designing some Serious Squash water bottles. I know this wasn't even an option on my poll. And I know the majority of you voted for shirts, but unless I did preorders I think this would be costly to stock pile all different sizes of shirts and I don't have that big of an apartment. Something to look forward to down the road though. Ok, enjoy reading about hydration planning for squash players.

HYDRATION
   HYDRATION PLANNING FOR SQUASH


True or False?(Answers at the bottom of the page)

STATEMENT/QUESTION
TRUE
FALSE
1
I only need to worry about hydration when I get thirsty?




2
An average 70kg person has approximately 42 liters of total body water?




3
Water is the most effective method for re-hydrating?




4
The facility temperature plays an important factor in preparing for proper hydration?




5
Pre-exercise versus post-exercise body weight measurement is an effective method for determining how much fluid was lost and needs to be replaced?



Fluid Requirements for Proper Hydration PRIOR to Exercise (1)
  • The goal of drinking before exercise is to avoid excessive dehydration
  • Drink 5-7ml per kg (of body weight) at least 4 hours before exercise
  • If you do not produce urine, or it is dark in colour drink another 3-5ml per kg (of body weight) 2 hours prior to exercise
  • Consuming drinks or food with small amounts of sodium will help retain fluid intake and induce thirst
  • Drink 200-600ml of fluid immediately prior to exercise (4)




True of False Answers
  1. False. By the time you are thirsty you are already dehydrated. Water quenches thirst even if you are still dehydrated, unlike sports drinks which taste better and makes you drink more fluid (1)
  2. True. Total body water averages 60% of one’s body weight. Small differences occur depending on body composition. Adipose tissue (fat) only contains 10% water whereas fat-free mass contains 70-80% water. Therefore trained athletes generally have a higher percentage of total body water (1)
  3. False. Small amounts of sodium (as found in sports drinks) assists in fluid retention. A proper hydration plan can help prepare for fluid (and electrolyte) loss (1). Water also turns off thirst before complete rehydration has occurred (9)
  4. True. Body temperature elevation increase the core temperature and elicits heat loss responses, increasing perspiration rate (1)
  5. True. Measuring pre and post-exercise body weights is a simple measuring tool for measuring how much weight (via perspiration) was lost. Another practical method for assessing hydration status is by determining the colour of your urine. Darker urine = more dehydrated (1) (see the dehydration page for more information)
FACT: Daily meal consumption is critical to maintain full hydration. Eating promotes fluid intake and retention (1)
DEHYDRATION
WARNING SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF DEHYDRATION (1,2)
    • Decreased total body water

    • Dark yellow coloured urine
    • Thirsty
    • Flushed skin or dizzy
    • Muscle cramping

YOU ARE AT AN INCREASED RISK OF DEHYDRATION IF…(1,2)
    • Any of the warning signs and symptoms are present
    • Your body weight loss is >2% (pre to post-exercise)
    • You are not properly hydrated when starting exercise
    • You’re a male or a larger person because they typically sweat more, therefore they need to replace more fluid
    • The temperature is hot and/or you are wearing heavy clothing
    • You’re in a prolonged or intense exercise session
    • You’re sick (and unable to keep fluids or food down)
    • You drink water rather than a sports drink during exercise

CONSEQUENCES OF DEHYDRATION (1,2)
    • Decreased exercise performance
    • Increased physiological stress
    • An increased heart rate and core body temperature
    • Increased perceived rate of exertion
    • Cognitive impairment, resulting in poor decision making, perception and concentration
    • Increased risk of heat exhaustion and heat stroke
    • Muscle fatigue and cramping
    • Dizzy spells
Fluid Requirements for Hydration Maintenance DURING Exercise (1.6) The goal of drinking during exercise is to prevent dehydration and maintain health and performance
  • Drink should contain small amounts of sodium, potassium and carbs (30-60g per hour of exercise)
  • Drink 150-350ml of fluid every 15-20 minutes during exercise
The fact that athletes regularly encounter dehydration during training and competition makes adequate fluid intake the number one nutrition intervention for all athletes.’ (8)

Even the most well-intentioned and well-educated athletes (with readily available fluids) experience dehydration because they underestimate their sweat loss (8)

REHYDRATION
DID YOU KNOW?

  • Well trained individuals generally perspire more than less fit individuals (2)
  • The more depleted your total body weight is, the more severe the physiological strain (1)
  • It is critical to focus on replacing extracellular fluid volume, including blood volume, which is accomplished by replacing the fluid and electrolytes lost (8). Water alone does not meet these requirements
  • Generally athletes only replace 30-70% of sweat loss during exercise, so a post-exercise weigh in can tell you how much more fluid is required for adequate rehydration (4)
  • Electrolytes (sodium and potassium) levels need to be reestablished after exercise to get back to an appropriate hydration level (1)

Fluid Requirements for Rehydration AFTER Exercise (1)
  • The goal of drinking after exercise is to replace fluid and electrolyte deficit
  • If severely dehydrated or if the recovery time is under <12 aggressive="" an="" font="" hours="" is="" rehydration="" required="" strategy="" then="">
  • Drink 1.5L of fluid for every kg of body weight lost
  • Best retention of fluids is done if fluid is consumed gradually (rather than in a single large dose)
  • Within the first 4 hours after exercise, consume 150% of fluid loss to compensate for ongoing sweat and urinary losses (4)
If an appropriate time has not elapsed since the previous exercise session, an aggressive rehydration plan may be required (1)


My Hydration Strategy
  1. I will prehydrate by drinking _______ml of _________ (which beverage), _______hours before exercise.
  2. My pre-exercise weight is ________lbs and my urine colour is__________ (clear/light yellow/dark yellow).
  3. I will have the following beverage ___________ readily available to replenish lost fluids and nutrients during exercise. I will drink _______ml every _______ minutes so that I drink the proper amount of fluid during exercise.
  4. My post-exercise weight is _______lbs, therefore I need to drink _______mls of __________ (which beverage) to properly replenish my fluid, carbs, protein, sodium and potassium.

H2versus
Popular Hydration Alternatives

  • Popular Beverages and their Nutritional Information

    Gatorade     Prime
    (7)
    Gatorade Perform
    (3, 7)





    Gatorade
    Recover
    (7)





    Powerade

    (9, 11)






    Coconut Water (10)





    1% Chocolate Milk (5)

    Serving Size (ml)

    118

    500

    500

    600

    330

    250



    Sodium (mg)

    110

    210

    230

    167

    60

    170

    Potassium
    (mg)

    30

    55

    17

    85

    670

    400

    Carbs (g
    25
    (21.2% of mixture)
    32
    (6.4 % of mixture)
    14
    (2.8% of mixture)
    46
    (7.7% of mixture)
    15
    (4.5% of mixture)
    31
    (12.4% of mixture)

    Protein (g)

    0

    0

    16

    0

    1

    7
    Best Consumed Before, During or After Exercise


    Before

    During
    or
    After


    After

    During
    or
    After


    After


    After
    Recommended requirements of a sports drink: 20-30 meq·L-1 sodium, 2-5 meq·L-1 potassium and a 6-8% carbohydrate mixture (1)
weight lost
References

  1. American College of Sports Medicine (2007). Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: Special Communications: Position Stands. Exercise and Fluid Replacement, 39(2), 709-731. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31890eb86 Retrieved May 17, 2012, from http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Fulltext/2007/02000/Exercise_and_Fluid_Replacement.22.aspx

  1. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (2012). Hydrate Right. It's About Eating Right. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=7084

  1. Australian Institute of Sport (2009, July). Fluid – Who Needs it? Australian Sports Commission. Retrieved May 18, 2012, from http://ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/hydration2/fluid_-_who_needs_it

  1. Australian Institute of Sport (2009, July). Squash. Australian Sports Commission. Retrieved May 18, 2012, from http://ausport.gov.au/ais/nutrition/factsheets/sports/squash

  1. Beatrice (n.d.). Our Products. Beatrice. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.beatrice.ca/products.php?p=specialty

  1. Coaching Association of Canada (2003, October 9). A Statement on Fluid Needs: Sport Nutrition Advisory Committee of the Coaching Association of Canada. Sport Nutrition: Position Papers and Position Statements. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.coach.ca/sport-nutrition-resources-s12664

  1. Gatorade (n.d.). Introducing the G Series. Gatorade. Retrieved May 18, 2012, from http://www.gatorade.ca/

  1. Murray, B. (2008). Dehydration and Rehydration: Preventing Dehydration: Sports Drink or Water. Gatorade Sports Science Institute. Retrieved May 18, 2012, from http://www.gssiweb.com/Article_Detail.aspx?articleid=701&level=2&topic=5

  1. Murray, B. (2008). Hydration Research: Sports Drinks: Myths and Facts. Gatorade Sports Science Institute. Retrieved May 18, 2012, retrieved from http://www.gssiweb.com/Article_Detail.aspx?articleid=573&level=2&topic=1

  1. O.N.E. (2012). O.N.E. Coconut Water. O.N.E. Drinks. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.onedrinks.com/one-healthy-drinks/coconut-water/

  1. The Coca-Cola Company (2011). Home: Powerade Isotonic. Powerade. Retrieved May 21, 2012, from http://www.powerade.com.au/Products/Powerade-Isotonic.htm



4 comments:

  1. Another great post however, you need to work on the layout. Your adds and fact sheets seem to bleed into each other (at least on my browser).

    Keep up the great work

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the feedback Jamie. I hope you can still make out what it says. I don't have anymore fact sheets to copy and past so hopefully it won't happen anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm an avid runner and I often find myself measuring my liquid input to avoid dehydration and water intoxication. There's a lot of hydration drink in the market that I've tried. Most days, I also make my own to make sure there's not much sugar in what I'm drinking. Water is crucial when our body perspires a lot and especially when running under intense heat. I choose hydration drinks that are dairy-free and vegan. I also go for non-GMO varieties and those with yummy flavors. I've stumbled on this site and it has a lot of hydration drink listings, so have a look-see: http://hikingmastery.com/food/best-hydration-drink.html

    ReplyDelete